Last edited by Daisida
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 | History

6 edition of Indigo from seed to dye found in the catalog.

Indigo from seed to dye

by Miller, Dorothy M.S.W.

  • 175 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Indigo Press, [Ordered from D. Miller] in Aptos, Calif .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Japan.
    • Subjects:
    • Indigo -- Japan.,
    • Polygonum tinctorium.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 52-53.

      Statementby Dorothy Miller ; [illustrations by Cranston-Benneth].
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsTP923 .M54 1981
      The Physical Object
      Pagination56 p. :
      Number of Pages56
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3796484M
      ISBN 100960406018
      LC Control Number81090694

        The indigo plant was known to early Guatemalan colonialists by the Nahuatl word xiquilite, and the dye was known to contemporaries as Guatemalan Indigo. 9 M. De Beauvais Raseau, writing about indigo cultivation in the Eighteenth Century, stated that the Native Americans also knew about extracting dye from the plant. Eliza used her crop to make seed and shared it with other planters, leading to an expansion in indigo production. She proved that colonial planters could make a profit in an extremely competitive market. Due to her successes, the volume of indigo dye exported increased dramatically from 5, pounds in –46, to , pounds by

        It seems that there are 2 primary means of extracting indigo from the plant: vat fermentation and composting. It was interesting to attend a symposium by the NC Arboretum, Growing Color, to hear indigo growers Sarah Bellos and Rowland Ricketts .   What is Baptisia? Baptisia (Baptisia australis) is a flowering perennial plant that is a member of the legume family which includes peas and is native to Eastern and Central North America. Another name for baptisia is false indigo because its flowers produce a blue dye that was once used as a cheap alternative to true indigo (Indigofera tinctoria), an Asian plant that was more .

      Apparently Japanese Indigo LOVES Texas that is as long as I keep it irrigated. To harvest, the Indigo is cut a few inches from the ground leaving the roots and some foliage on the plant. In a month the plants will grow back, and be ready for another harvest. The harvested Indigo plants are . Natural Dye Books. Indigo from Seed to Dye. Indigo: Dye It, Make It: Techniques from plain and dip-dyeing to tie-dyeing and batik, in natural indigo blue. Wild Color, Revised and Updated Edition: The Complete Guide to Making and Using Natural Dyes. Natural Dyes.


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Indigo from seed to dye by Miller, Dorothy M.S.W. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Miller encountered indigo dyeing while living in that country in the 's. In she returned to get seeds and to research the art herself, growing and harvesting the indigo plants, Indigo from seed to dye book the dye, dyeing the fibers and weaving the indigo dyed yarn.

The purpose of this/5. Indigo from Seed to Dye by Dorothy Miller (Author) out of 5 stars 5 ratings. ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book Cited by: 2.

This 60 page paperback journal cum manual covers one woman's experience with natural indigo. This is the fifth edition, published in and contains lots of useful information on the cultivation and use of Japanese indigo aka dyers knotweed aka persicaria tinctoria aka polygonum : Graham Keegan.

This book passes on information learned by a Santa Cruz woman who grew her own indigo plants and maintained indigo dye vats. I think this book is of particular importance to anyone wishing to grow.

Making indigo plant dye requires a fermentation process that causes a magical color change. The primary plants used to make indigo are woad and Japanese indigo, but there are a couple of lesser known sources. Whichever plant you acquire, there are numerous steps to making the dye. Indigo is said to be the oldest dye, with cloth in the hue found.

Dyeing takes place in the green form of indigo which is known, confusingly, as white indigo. The paste is mixed with ash water, fruit sugars or rice whiskey, and left to ferment.

After a few days of stirring and adding sugars, it’s ready to dye with. Keeping an indigo vat alive is tricky, but Patricia has continually nurtured this vat for 25 years.

The indigo plant has been used for thousands of years to produce the beautiful color of the same name. The leaves can dye cloth a rich bluish-purple. True indigo is Indigofera tinctoria and it can be grown successfully by seed for a pretty flowering shrub or to provide you with leaves to make a natural blue dye.

How to Plant Indigo Seeds. Indigo in North America. Until indigo dye was synthesized in Europe ina species of Asian Indigofera was a huge cash crop wherever it could be grown.

"In the s, Europeans colonized North America, and immediately started trying to. Soak the seeds overnight in water and then sow your seeds in pots at least 3 inches in diameter, one seed per pot (pots are better than seed trays because indigo does not like to have its roots disturbed).

Keep the pots in a heated propagator until the seeds germinate and then move them to warm windowsill. Plant Isatis tinctoria seeds if you live in a non-tropical climate. This type of indigo tolerates cold weather best, though it may not thrive if your area has long winters, meaning longer than 4 months.

It's a subshrub, which means it's thinner than a shrub, and will grow to about 3–6 feet (– m). Keep in mind that Isatis tinctoria has only 1/4 of the dye pigment contained in other Views: 23K.

Indigo from seed to dye. [Dorothy Miller, (Social worker)] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book: All Authors / Contributors: Dorothy Miller, (Social worker) Find more information about: ISBN:. It would be interesting to produce my own indigo, and Ms.

Miller's information is well presented, concise, yet very descriptive. I hope to give it a go sometime. The bookseller's service was wonderful, much more prompt than my review. Book was better condition than described, delivery was very fast, and I 5/5.

So you’re growing Japanese indigo (or other indigo-producing plants) in your garden this year. You planted the seeds, cared for the plants maybe you have even harvested some leaves and done a fresh indigo dye bath. But what do you do if you want to have homegrown botanic Read More.

Indigo dye is an organic compound with a distinctive blue ically, indigo was a natural dye extracted from the leaves of some plants of the Indigofera genus, in particular Indigofera tinctoria; dye wielding Indigofera plants were commonly grown and used throughout the world, in Asia in particular, as an important crop, with the production of indigo dyestuff economically important.

Because the rich, blue dye extracted from the indigo plant was rare—and expensive—it was a symbol of status and wealth and in high demand in Europe. In the first shipment of indigo left for England, and within two decades more than a million pounds would be shipped each year, making the dye one of the colony’s largest exports, second.

It’s a picture book with some how-to’s, about this group of traditional peoples in China who are The Masters of Indigo. Their textile work is breathtaking, and its all done with ancient methods. For instance, some of their indigo fabric is a shiny metallic purple. Indigo pigment grows naturally in the leaves of a large number of plant species from around the world.

This plant, Persecaria Tinctoria, also know as Polygonum Tinctorum, has been a staple source of blue in East Asia for millennia. It is known for being relatively easy. There are so many ways of using fresh indigo to dye with, but I wanted to make a vat to maximise the amount of leaves I had.

I went through my dye books for recipes of various indigo vats and settled on one I found in the book Wild Colour. It was similar to the one I had used for a woad vat in previous years so I was familiar with the steps.

The Production of Indigo Dye from Plants is the final report in a three-part series. This report presents a study of the technical, environmental, and economic factors involved in indigo dye production from Persicaria tinctoria, with the aim to support increased farm-scale indigo production in the Northern California fibershed and main approaches to dye production—compost and.

Description. Indigofera tinctoria is the name for true indigo, a plant whose dark purple dye was once a primary object of trade.

Although several other plants are used for a similar purpose, including false indigo (baptista australis) and dyer’s woad (isatis tinctoria), true indigo is the most coveted. This is the plant most credited with being the origin of indigo pigment.

The bright pigments, organically coming from the leaves of the plant, create a dye .After a few minutes of exposure to the air and the desired blue hue has been achieved, the excess dye can then be rinsed off. If your color has turned out unevenly you can repeat the dye process to help even out the color.

Fabrics that are tied or clamped as in Tie-dye or Shibori look fantastic when dyed with Indigo.‎Discover indigo; one of the most mystical yet widely used dyes in the world.

Featuring inspirational images and presented with a luxurious exposed and patterned spine, this book shows you how to grow, extract and dye with indigo. From cowboys’ denim to the jeans in your wardrobe, indigo.